Friday, December 28, 2012

bread. make it.

and we're baccccccckkkkkk. (i'm saying this like a radio show host) (wait, i'm saying this like jimmy fallon on saturday night live)

see how i just used a double parenthesis there? because i have no rules here on the inter webs. you know what else has no rules? the time in between christmas and new years...the time where you aren't detoxing, but want to. the in-between-time where there are no rules on carbs and calories because you're saying to yourself, come january 1, i'm going to detox!

or is that just me?

also breaking common sense rules is the fact that commercial breads contain l-cysteine which is derived from human hair collected in chinese barber shops. did you just throw up? ya. this is why you need to make your own bread or buy organic!

anyway, josephine is bringing us a little bread recipe that is truly a treasure of goodness. i ate this with the best tomato soup i've ever eaten when i was sick and it was a phenom. uh. null. combination. 

josephine says: not only does it taste better, but it is much cheaper to make. i calculated that this costs me 50 cents per loaf.

jami says: omg. i have been paying $3-$4 per loaf at my local whole foods. i'm basically a dumb-dumb. i will now repent and turn from my baking sins. 


Traditional White Bread  
Yields a 2 lb loaf


Ingredients

1 ½ cups warm whole milk or 2% milk
2 tablespoons butter
4 cups bread flour
1 ¾ teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons white sugar
2 ½ teaspoons active dry yeast

Directions

1)Add all the ingredients in order to the pan in the bread maker. Before adding the yeast, make a well in the center. And make sure the salt won’t touch the yeast because salt kills yeast. Choose 'dough' cycle and Press start.




josephine says: Yeast is such a hard ingredient to work with. It’s probably why most people feel intimidated to make their own bread. However, consider investing in a bread maker. all you need is a cheap one... I have one that only cost me $60, exactly like this one.


jami says: i mean, do you really need a bread machine?

josephine says: i don't bake the bread in here. i've tried it and it doesn't turn out as great as when i do it in the oven. and it's worth my time... it does it just right since the yeast is so fussy to work with. 
It mixes and kneads the dough AND does the first rise, so i don't have to fuss with it all day.

jami says: so you don't crush up your own hair in the bread? haha. awkward silence. good to know! i'm going to go throw up now since i can't stop thinking about hair in food.
2)Once the dough is done, take it out from the bread maker. 

Lightly flour the counter and knead the dough for 1 minute.  

Shape it into oval shape, dust a little more flour on top of the dough loaf, and place it into a buttered 9-inch loaf pan. 
jami says: oh, look at you...no cooking spray? that's a little gangster.

josephine says: I wouldn't recommend greasing the loaf pan with non-stick spray pan because it would make the crust too crispy. You only need about 1/2 tablespoon softened butter to grease the pan. It is probably the same amount of calories as non-stick spray without the chemicals.

 Cover with plastic wrap...this is better than wet towels as far as keeping moisture in. Let rise in a warm place. Your stove area would be a great place since it's already warm. 

The second rise takes about 45 minutes to 1 hour and the size will be doubled. 
josephine says: i love this loaf pan.
3) Preheat oven to 350F. Bake the bread for about 35 minutes. Cool on rack. Wait 5 minutes before slicing.
and carbohydrate magic ensues. let the muffin tops happen. until january 1. then we'll all kill it...right? right? maybe?
josephine says: just a reminder, Homemade bread doesn't have any preservatives. So it doesn't keep soft as long as those store-bought breads. When your bread dries out, please do not throw all that work out! This particular bread makes great French toast and homemade croutons. Obviously, I can post those recipes later!

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josephine is a married mother of 2, living in kansas city and is a VERY practiced cook and baker. she is the new recipe contributor on this blog and will be bringing you a new recipe almost every week. get excited.

38 comments:

  1. A bread machine is on my list when we move.... I don't have space for it now. I love bread, most any kind but Rye, and especially sourdough. I use my Bosch to mix doughs often but sometimes put a little hand kneading in.... or I go with a no knead dough which is always fun.
    Check out King Arthur Flour for all kinds of bread goodies, I especially love their rising buckets and flour. Glad you have seen the light with the bread, I didn't know that about the hair.... that's sick. Ugh now I don't ever want to buy it.
    Looking forward to reading more recipes!
    Anna
    www.akginspiration.com

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    1. isn't the hair thing unbelievable???

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  2. I have made home made bread for almost 20 years now. Which is saying a lot, since I am ONLY 34.=) I have found that active dry yeast is simple to work with. MIx it with the dry ingredients, and then it isn't as bothered by the warmth of the wets. I have never made a loaf of bread that hasn't turned out. (knock on wood) It really is much easier than you would think Kudos for sharing your tips!

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  3. That bread looks delicious! Years ago I had a breadmaker and sold it in a garage sale! Kicking myself now!

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  4. uh! yes, please!
    let's just not talk about detox, mkay?
    i am probably functioning on sugar/carbs alone these days...i'm a bad girl. lol!
    and thanks for the tip on the chinese barber shops...hadn't heard that one.
    ***GAGS***
    i'm all about the sprouted bread over here, so hopefully we're not consuming any follicular matter...gags again.
    can josephine teach me how to make that, too(uh, sprouted bread)?
    thanks for the inspiration, girlies!

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    1. i don't know if jo makes sprouted bread but i'll ask! i too am the gal living on carbs and sugar. let us repent together and detox. :)

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    2. Mary, I have never made sprouted bread. But I make whole-wheat or honey grain bread all the time. I'd love to share those recipes later if you and others are interested. :)

      Thanks for reading!

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    3. Mary, I have never made sprouted bread. But I make whole-wheat and honey-grain breads all the time. I'd love to share those recipes if you and others are interested. :)

      Thanks for reading!

      Delete
  5. This looks delicious! I've never used a bread machine, but I'm going to borrow my mom's so I can try it :) When I'm putting all the ingredients in - in order - do I stir it at all before making the well? Should the butter be softened? Do I put the yeast in the well or just on one side and the salt on the other? Yikes, so many questions. I am clearly NOT an experienced bread maker :) Thanks for your blog, Jami. I've been reading for a few months now and really appreciate and enjoy it! And this addition of Josephine's recipes are fun too! Happy New Year to you!

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    1. I LOVE your questions!

      -No, you don't need to stir it at all before making the well.
      -Yes, I'd recommend using softened butter. This helps the butter being evenly distributed in the dough.
      -When you make the well, you should automatically push the salt on one side. Then you put the yeast in the center/well.

      Thanks for your questions!

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    2. jospehine responded below but i thought i'd respond directly to you!

      I LOVE your questions!

      No, you don't need to stir it at all before making the well.
      Yes, I would recommend using softened butter. It helps the butter being evenly distributed in the dough.
      When you make the well, you should automatically push the salt on one side. Then you put the yeast in the well.

      Thanks again for your questions!

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    3. Thank you!! Can't wait to try this! :)

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  6. Perfectly good bread machines end up at second hand stores. I bought mine for eight dollars and had a week to return it if it didn't work.

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  7. You had me at the human hair comment...my hubs and I have tried to make homemade bread before - but always baked in the bread machine. I love Josephine's tip to take it out of the machine to bake - Can't wait to try that out!

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    1. i never had thought of that either. but it has a chance to get fluffier in the oven and i think you just have more control over it. jospephine would probably be able to tell you the differences.

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    2. I perfectly understand it is MUCH easier to let the bread machine do all the steps for us. However, if you wish to use homemade bread for sandwiches, most bread machines wouldn't be able to give you the usual sandwich bread shape. Also, bread that comes from bread machine tends to have a very dry exterior; it would even collapse on top sometimes. Jami was right. It is all about having more control over this tricky "business".

      Happy baking!

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  8. You had me at the human hair comment...the hubs and I have tried to make bread before in the bread machine but always left it in there to bake. Can't wait to try Josephine's recipe and to bake it in the oven! Thanks!

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  10. I LOVE your questions!

    No, you don't need to stir it at all before making the well.
    Yes, I would recommend using softened butter. It helps the butter being evenly distributed in the dough.
    When you make the well, you should automatically push the salt on one side. Then you put the yeast in the well.

    Thanks again for your questions!

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  11. The bread machine makes it SO much easier and less time consuming. I got mine (one that currently sells on Amazon for $200) for $25...yes, twenty-five dollars, at goodwill! It works like a charm. I'm definitely going to try this recipe. Looks delish.

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  12. Thank you so much! I've been looking for a great, basic white bread recipe -- can't wait to try this. The husband (because sometimes he's more domestic than I am) has been on me to start making our bread. Also, because obviously, as a SAHM, I eat bonbons and watch soap operas all day. Duh. ;)

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  13. We have a bread maker(got it as a wedding gift 11 years ago) and its worth its weight in gold. We also bake our breads in the oven. Hubby is a master at English Muffin Bread and we toast it twice then put our own homemade honey on it. DE-li-shous! :)
    P.S. Your bread looks so...pretty:)

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  14. I would gladly try this recipe if not for a miserable parade of familial allergies that keep us off, among a myriad of other things, gluten and dairy. I do, however, condescend to making the odd gf, df loaf in the ol' bread maker ( 5 bucks at a yard sale, brand new, Cha-ching). On the whole, though, it's been a miserable process frought with rock-hard loaves, family mutinies and late night runs to Trader Joe's.

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  15. How long would you say a loaf would last? We are frugally trying to do everything we can to eat healthier. So .50 for a loaf can't be said no to! lol!! But, we go through a load or two a week. So I'm wondering how often I will have to make it. Also, I don't have a bread maker.. as you saw on my instagram all I have is my new pink mixer. ;) :)
    Is it okay to just use that? It worked fine for the homemade dough for the cinnamon rolls. But, I've never made homemade bread.

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    Replies
    1. Lauren, Thanks for your questions!

      It really depends on how many people in your family, how often you make sandwiches and toasts etc, and how much you like the bread. A loaf lasts for about a week or for my family of 4.

      I'd say a mixer can do the job if you know how to properly rise the dough afterwards. After you mix the dough, you take it out and knead it till it is elastic. Form it into a ball and place it in an oiled bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let it rise. This is the 1st rise. When it is puffed up, you punch the dough down and knead it for a minute. Then you can follow the steps being explained and illustrated in this post and do the second rise and baking. Does it make sense?

      Let me know how it goes!

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  16. jami and josephine - you make the most intimidating things sound easy and fun. how do you do that? after watching all my make-your-own-bread-nazi-friends do it forever, by some miracle i now want to try it too. thanks for that!

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  17. We've been making our own bread for about a year now. It took some practice but we figure out how to mix it just right in our KitchenAid. Even my ten-year old can do it now! It's so worth figuring out! So much better than store bought...which is usually the case isn't it?

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  18. Hey! Now after feeling guilty for serving my family hair follicles I must ask... Jo, can you share the honey/ wheat recipe? Or a whole grain or oat nut variety? You can emaile too at arconnell@gmail.com.,

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    1. Benanda-

      I will definitely be sharing more bread recipes in the near future, including whole wheat and honey grain breads.

      Thanks for reading!

      Delete
  19. Oh I'm excited! About Josephine's recipe contributions not hair in my bread (I just puked a little!)

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  20. Love this recipe:) Can't wait to try!

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  21. I 100%identify with the part about the time between Christmas and NewYears! So funny to see someone else vocalize it!

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  22. I 100% identify with the part about the time between Christmas and New Years! So funny to see someone else vocalize it!

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  23. I have an identical Oster breadmaker and I have a question about the dough cycle you used. You mentioned that "It mixes and kneads the dough AND does the first rise, so i don't have to fuss with it all day." The dough cycle on this machine does a first very short rise and then punches the bread down and does another longer rise. Do you wait until the end of the dough cycle to take the dough out, or do you take it out after the first short rise? I'm new to this and have had really bad results baking the bread in this breadmaker, so I'm excited to try just doing the dough there and then baking in the oven.

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    Replies
    1. Hi-

      Yay to the same bread maker! I apologize that I am just now replying your question. I hope you still have the bread maker because it is an awesome gadget!

      Yes, you DO wait until the end of the dough cycle to take the dough out. That is what first rise means for me.

      Thanks again for the question!

      Happy baking!
      Josephine

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